How The US Government Could Kill Aston Martin

If there's anything in this world worth keeping, it's an Aston Martin. Unfortunately, the lovely men and women that make laws regarding automobile safety don't agree, and unless Aston does something drastic, the manufacturer could close its doors indefinitely.

In order for Aston Martin to make money, its volume sellers - the DB9 and Vantage - have to, y'know, sell. However, due to changing US regulations regarding vehicle side impact safety, Aston Martin may have to halt the sales of these models, as they don't meet the standard. If this happens, Aston Martin chairman James Walker says the company would operate at a loss in this market and could potentially close completely until a solution is reached.

Aston Martin is currently filing for an exemption to this regulation, but the British manufacturer is indeed on thin ice, as it's their last chance to make the company profitable in the US market. Here's why this is supremely important, as per Bloomberg:

Known for its sports cars featured in James Bond movies, Gaydon, England-based Aston Martin is one of the few ultra-luxury auto producers that doesn't belong to a larger manufacturing group. The 101-year-old company's independence has hampered its ability to fund new models, including the next-generation DB9 and Vantage, which have been delayed.

Next month, U.S. regulators will begin implementing an additional crash test meant to protect passengers from sideway-collisions into utility poles, trees and other narrow, fixed objects. Aston Martin last year requested an exemption for the DB9 through August 2016 and for the Vantage through August 2017.

What can we do as lowly car enthusiasts? Write a strongly worded letter to your Congress men and women. Take to the streets and protest. Buy a Vantage and do burnouts while shouting "NO V12s NO PEACE!"


Tavarish is the founder of APiDA Online and writes about buying and selling cool cars on the internet. He owns the world's cheapest Mercedes S-Class, a graffiti-bombed Lexus, and he's the only Jalopnik author that has never driven a Miata. He also has a real name that he didn't feel was journalist-y enough so he used a pen name and this was the best he could do.